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Jonathan Corbet

This post on how scammers use Chase's confirmation system to get victims to open up their accounts:

https://shkspr.mobi/blog/2024/05/bank-scammers-using-genuine-push-notifications-to-trick-their-victims/

Decades ago, we saw universal connectivity as a path to freedom. Instead, we have created a world where we are literally subject to dozens (if not many more) attempts to rip us off every day. We've made a world that is much more predatory and hostile, and it is getting worse.

Thus far, I've managed to avoid falling victim to any of these attempts. But I can only wonder when, as I get older and more confused and the scammers get more sophisticated, that will change. "When", rather than "if", seems like the relevant word here.

Oh well...I guess I'll get more coffee and read more email, I'm sure that will make me feel better.
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@corbet

In many settings, networks of real humans who know each other are going to become more important (again).

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@corbet Even for tech guys it's just a question when they catch us off guard in a vulnerable moment. Best example is this story from Cory Doctorow:

https://pluralistic.net/2024/02/05/cyber-dunning-kruger/#swiss-cheese-security

Like in many fields, only the whole society is able to protect the individuals against such bad actors. An individual can only protect himself so far.

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@andy @corbet Reminds me of the time when even Jim Browning, a guy who outs scammers, got scammed

https://youtu.be/YIWV5fSaUB8

And here’s another one as well

https://youtu.be/dQw4w9WgXcQ

The future is scary

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@corbet

There was an interesting account by @pluralistic recently about the time he got snaffled by a scammer.

They just happened to make a call at the right time, when a few other distractions and coincidences were aligned. His brain was primed to expect a certain chain of events, and the scammers got through his defences.

That's the scary part. Just takes one bad day to add yourself to the statistics.

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