Conversation

Lorenzo Stoakes

Just saw that the nvidia CEO said 'don't learn to code' and now I seriously wish I'd bought an AMD GPU.

This really has to be the most delusional hype wave I've seen in my lifetime. So many 'experts' exposing themselves as easily led fools...
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Let's not forget that this kind of talk is HUGELY harmful to young people. Imagine a young person considering programming today and being told from all sides that there's 'no point'.

These idiots screw themselves over, because they need programmers (both those programming hardware and software) to actually do things to make their ideas happen.

The better question is - what exactly does a CEO do that an LLM can't? They both talk a lot of hallucinatory drivel and waffle on. The match there is vastly better than for programmers who need absolute precision (and thus render the hallucinations a fatal flaw).
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Underlying it all, of course, is a resentment and contempt towards programmers, something which has blatantly existed for 40+ years? More? Forever?

Since the beginning the 'very important' CEO types have hated having to pay programmers a good salary or to accept that there's a creative process at play rather than you know, a factory one.

Obviously some companies vastly more enlightened than others, but on average, this.
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@ljs As someone that you probably consider "young people" (1998) I can confirm this.

When I was in college I noticed how no one cared about learning to program at different levels. Every programming subject was focused on web application design using existing frameworks so you never needed to care about "how does this work".

I decided that was not what I wanted and started to learn other kind of programming i.e networking, operative systems, system engineering..

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@ljs And in my 3rd year I landed a pretty good job. Other students were wondering how this happened.

Well, it turns out they were being set for lower-income jobs by the university itself. The reason behind that is that local companies are giving money to the research groups and influencing what they teach.

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@ljs Yeah, when I was a young fellow at my first real job (or it was maybe my latest internship can't remember), I had this enlightening moment, during a discussion with a higher up management person. This person basically told me "But that should be done quickly right, what you guys do is just like assembling lego bricks together to make something bigger right?"....

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@ljs ... Luckily for me this came early in my career as this helped me understand pretty much all of it, the low pay, the _this has to be done yesterday moments_, the "how come you are this senior and still coding?".

And now with AI, I mean, why can't an AI assemble lego bricks way better than human right?

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@ljs I find it more worrying than most of these “experts” are high-up managers or even CEOs of big companies.

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@james why? the literal 'most famous tech guy in the world' is a transparent scammer, the bar is so low it's into the crust of the earth.
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@mathieu yeah, sadly I think many of us learn this the hard way.

The AI scam fits precisely into what these people want to believe, and now with the markets expecting every company to have an AI strategy there's a horrible monster at play in tech.
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@ljs That’s why it’s worrying.

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