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GERMAN VILLAGE IN KOREA
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@hyeyoo Was ist das?? @james you might like this :) <- authentic German
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@james @hyeyoo do you have british pubs in Germany? :>)
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@james @hyeyoo This is a global phenomenon.
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@james @hyeyoo LOL looks like a very confused place.

They need to update the name now too
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Edited 8 months ago
@james @ljs Interestingly no German people live here. In the 1970s, some Korean miners went to Germany for several years because the pay was higher than in Korea.

The village was built for them. Now it's a famous tourists destination; and the shops sells german foods and sourvenirs imported from Germany.
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@james @ljs So not even close to being authentic :)

But has a story.
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@james @hyeyoo a lot of stereotypes are at least somewhat accurate, they're like a distillation of habits and patterns of a culture.

But they are not ALL that a culture is.

Another aspect to all this is the need to adjust the stereotypes to suit the tastes of the host country.

For instance, cuisines are typically adjusted to appeal to locals who might not like the 'raw' version of that cuisine as it is in the real country.
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Edited 8 months ago
@james @ljs

Things like "German thing," "Czech thing", "British thing," or "Korean thing" are inherently full of stereotypes and do not encompass all aspects of a culture.

But tourists often want to experience (and even purchase) these stereotypes because they encapsulate the stories of many people in that culture had to endure.

For example, Korean Kimchi has evolved throughout history, and the current recipe includes chili powder after the introduction of chili in 19th century in Korea, during war.

But if you replace the chili powder with something else that was not available in Korea, it's not "Korean" because it does not reflect its historical roots.
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